Posts Tagged ‘fraud’

Marching to the beat of Fraud Prevention

SecuritySo, it’s March. A month where we (hopefully) start seeing the beginning of the end of winter’s lingering effects. March also signals the arrival of Fraud Prevention Month. Now in its 10th year, the global campaign serves as a refresher on how to avoid scams.

“Fraud: Recognize it. Report it. Stop it” is the theme of the long-running campaign that helps educate Canadians about the potential dangers fraudsters pose. Every year, thousands of Canadians fall victim to fraud and anyone can be a target. It can happen to the best of us, so being aware and cautious can help you avoid these traps.

In an earlier post, we discussed tips to avoid phishing scams, so here’s a reminder:

  • Rogers will not call and ask for account information – if we’re calling you, it means we already know who you are!
  • At no point will a Rogers rep ask for confidential information such as login names, passwords, credit card information and/or immediate payment for tech support services
  • Rogers does not share customer information with any third parties without the customer’s consent unless permitted or required by law. You should refuse any unsolicited offers of technical support, even if the caller claims to be from a reputable company.

Some additional tips to stay safe:

  • Monitor your account closely and watch for unusual activity.
  • Change your password regularly and make sure your online passwords are complicated. Try to avoid using the same password for multiple accounts.
  • Avoid sharing your personal or financial information in an email, text or over the phone.

More ways to stay informed throughout the month:

  • On March 11, FCAC (Financial Consumer Agency of Canada) will be participating in “2 Good 2 to B True Day.” Canadians can join the conversation and share their fraud experiences on Twitter using the #2G2BT hashtag.
  • You can also follow @FCACan on Twitter for FCAC’s Tweet of the Day—a series of tips on how to protect against fraud.

Remember, if you think you’ve been duped, don’t panic, there are a number of resources to help you fight back. If you suspect that you may be a target of fraud, contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-800-495-8501 or visit their website. For more tips on staying safe online visit TechEssentials.rogers.com.

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Weekend Reading: highlights from CTS & a fraud prevention refresher

Highlights from the Canadian Telecom Summit

The Canadian Telecom Summit took place June 4-6 at the Toronto Congress Centre and featured sessions on LTE, wireless broadband, privacy and security, and the evolution of consumer communications. For your weekend reading this week, we’ve compiled some articles on the discussions that happened at the event:

  • Mobile Syrup covered a presentation by Bernard Lord, President & CEO of the CWTA (Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association) about the state of the wireless industry in Canada. According to Bernard, wireless penetration in Canada is set to exceed 100 per cent in just the next few years.” He also predicted that 30 million Canadians will have a wireless device by 2014. Read Mobile Syrup’s full post for more stats on coverage, antenna sites, and mobile data.
  • The Financial Post and The Toronto Star covered a talk from Rob Bruce, Head of Communications for Rogers, and focused on growth opportunities for Canada as well as foreign ownership rules. This Reuters article also talked about M2M, or machine-to-machine technology and the potential for connected devices like fridges and smoke alarms.
  • Along with Jacob Glick of Google Canada, and Dave Caputo of Sandvine, our very own @RogersKeith spoke about social media opportunities for carriers in Canada. To read the full article, go here.

Fraud prevention update

Back in November, we wrote a post on the basics of fraud prevention. This week, in light of major hackings uncovered with LinkedIn and eHarmony as well as reports in our Community Forums about “spam” and “phishing” increases, we thought it would be a good idea to provide some helpful resources to protect yourself and your PC.

If you believe you’ve been targeted by fraudulent activity, please contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-800-495-8501 or http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/

True Blood marathons – Season premiere on Sunday!

This week, we hosted an exclusive premiere of True Blood Season 5 for Rogers “Truebies” before it officially airs this Sunday at 9pm ET on HBO Canada. If you weren’t one of the lucky ones on the guest list, don’t worry! You can catch up this weekend with a marathon of Season 4 on Rogers Anyplace TV. HBO Canada is also running a marathon until June 10 – full schedule here.

Kelly Farrell is a regular contributor to RedBoard

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Protect yourself and your PC from fraud

Rogers and fraud preventionYou probably spend quite a bit of time on your personal computer, but how well are you protecting it and your personal information?

There are a number of risks out there like  viruses, “malware” (malicious software), hackers, scammers, and more. These risks increase each year.

Recently, some Rogers customers have been targeted by telephone calls from fraudsters posing as technical support agents from reputable technology companies such as Microsoft, Yahoo! or Norton. During these fraudulent calls, customers are told that Rogers has detected a virus on their PC and are asked to provide the caller with remote access to their PC in order to remove the virus and install preventative anti-virus software.

Rogers support agents only ask for remote access to your computer when you have called in for technical support.  If you receive an offer of unsolicited technical support, be aware that the request may be fraudulent.

Here’s how to recognize fraudulent activity:

  • Unsolicited offers of technical support – Rogers does not share customer information with any third parties such as Microsoft, Yahoo or Norton related to potential virus infections or performance issues on your computer. You should refuse any unsolicited offers of technical support, even if the caller claims to be from a reputable company
  • Being asked for confidential information  – Customers contacted by a Rogers agent will never be asked to provide:
    • Confidential information like login names and passwords
    • Credit card information and/or immediate payment for tech support services

By keeping these tips in mind, you can keep yourself and your PC safe.

If you believe you’ve been targeted by fraudulent activity, please contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-800-495-8501 or http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/.

Heather is a regular contributor to RedBoard

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