Rogers meets changing customer needs with new Hi-Speed Internet tiers

With the rapid rise of online video, social media and online gaming, the way Canadians use the Internet is changing dramatically. We’re always reviewing our plans to ensure they meet your changing needs so starting later this month, our Hi-Speed Internet tiers are being upgraded with faster download speeds and higher data allowances for customers on Rogers DOCSIS 3.0, our best and fastest wireline network.

The new plans apply to Rogers Hi-Speed Internet Express, Extreme, Extreme Plus and Ultimate tiers. In late July we will begin automatically upgrading customers on Rogers DOCSIS 3.0 to our enhanced plans at no additional cost.

Customers on a DOCSIS 2.0 modem or home networking modem can upgrade to these new tiers by visiting a Rogers retail location and upgrading to a DOCSIS 3.0 home networking modem. The prices on our new DOCSIS 3.0 tiers match our existing price plans and a DOCSIS 3.0 home networking modem only costs an extra $1.50 to $3 per month over the cost of a DOCSIS 2.0 modem.

As one example, customers on our Extreme plan and using a DOCSIS 3.0 modem will see their download speeds¹ increase from up to 15 Mbps to up to 24 Mbps and their data allowance increase from 80 GB to 100 GB at no additional cost. The updated Extreme plan allows customers to stream approximately 90 hours of content on Rogers On Demand Online or 50 HD movies per month.

Check out the below chart for a complete breakdown of the changes:

Unsure if you have a DOCSIS 3.0 modem? It is the Wireless N Gateway modem and you can see what it looks like here.

Also starting later this month, you’ll be able to add a data assurance option if you’re currently using the Express and Extreme tiers. For an extra $20 per month, you’ll receive an extra 80 GB of data on top of your existing allowances. If you don’t need quite as much data, you can also get an additional 20 GB for an extra $5 per month.

Marina Guy is a regular contributor to RedBoard

¹Speeds may vary with internet traffic, server, gateway/router, computer (quality, location in the home, software and applications installed), home wiring, home network or other factors. Also see the Acceptable Use Policy at rogers.com/terms. Modem set-up: the system is configured to maximum modem capabilities within Rogers own network.
²Usage allowances apply on a monthly basis and vary by tier of service. Charges may apply for additional use beyond the monthly usage allowance associated with your tier of service. For details, visit rogers.com/keepingpace.
³Up to 75 Mbps in Atlantic region
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Rogers meets changing customer needs with new Hi-Speed Internet tiers , 1.7 out of 5 based on 118 ratings
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  1. So Rogers think that 60 GB of monthly ‘usage allowance’ is enough to stream HD videos, music, upgrade PCs/Tablets/Phones to the OS version, download games, movies, music…

    Someone from Rogers need to explains why their is a monthly ‘usage allowance’ on Internet services but not on TV services since they both go through the same cable.

  2. Rob McDougall says: July 20th, 2011 a 11:40am

    It looks like the only DOCSIS 3.0 device is a combination modem/router. Will other hardware options be offered? I already have a wireless router that I use in conjunction with my DOCSIS 2.0 modem. I don’t want to have to spend extra money for functionality I don’t need. I also prefer to be able to upgrade these two capabilities separately. I’d like to have a DOCSYS 3.0 modem only option. Is such an option going to be made available?

    • the built in router is pretty bad. You can do what I did and disable the router feature of the modem and just use it normally.

  3. For those of us who have made a significant investment in our home network (high end router, great wireless coverage), will there every be a Modem only DOCSIS 3 option? My home networking gear is much more robust and problem free then the Rogers/SMC wireless gateway does’nt really work in router mode, has GB Ethernet issues, etc…) when compared to the SMC Wireless gatway and I’d rather just get a new modem… any plans in the near future? Or any possibility of offering DOCSIS 3 speeds on older modems – My SciAM Webstar 2100 modem (Docsis2 – http://www.cisco.com/web/consumer/support/modem_DPC2100.html#~features) is capable of doing up to 43MB .. do I have to get a new modem or can I continue to use mine? Especially when I can get 20MB + (with speedboost of course) when testing with speedtest.net.

    Speed increases are great but all they allow us to do is to get to our low data caps faster. These days with youtube, netflix, voip, work VPN (heavy work from home user) $60 for 100 GB of data is pretty expensive, especially when a GB of data probabally costs Rogers pennies per user. Competitors are starting to offer higher data caps for a similar price. In Toronto you can get a plan for same or slightly cheaper start @ 200GB in Vancouver you can get 50Mb for $29 a month with a 400 GB data cap! In my case speed (Currently 10Mb extreme) is not an issue its the monthly data cap. While having an option to add more data is great but the costs are way too high.

    I really like Rogers Cable TV services and I would like to keep all of my services with Rogers but if not competitive when my current deal/contract expires I may have to look somewhere else. Rogers I really really want to stay with you, but please price your services competitively.

    Love the blog, any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    Warmest regards,
    M@

    • RogersMarina says: July 20th, 2011 a 2:42pm

      Hi Matt,

      Thank you for all your feedback! We have no details at this time on a modem only option. If anything changes, we will let you know.

      I am really glad to hear you love our blog!

      Best,
      Marina

      • Marina,

        What about Matt’s question regarding DOCSIS 2 modems? I also have a DOCSIS 2 modem that is very capable of handling 32 Mbps. Why should I buy a DOCSIS 3 modem? Will Rogers allow me to use my existing modem at upgraded speeds?

        • RogersMarina says: July 20th, 2011 a 3:16pm

          Hi Anon,

          The DOCSIS 3.0 Wireless N Gateway is capable of providing a greater range and higher speeds than the current DOCSIS 2.0 device, up to 300 metres under ideal conditions. Customers on a DOCSIS 2.0 modem can upgrade to these new tiers by visiting a Rogers retail location and upgrading to a DOCSIS 3.0 modem.

          Cheers,
          Marina

        • I don’t know the exact technical reasons but docsis 2 only binds to I think 2 channels to push data where docsis 3 binds to 6? I’m guessing at the numbers but either way it takes more effort to reach the higher speeds with docsis2 than with docsis3.. That and going into the future they want to push faster speeds that docsis 2 doesn’t support and it is easier for them if everyone is using the same tech so they only have to support 1 type..

          All that said a stand alone modem would be best.. And I can’t just go to a rogers store and upgrade for free, I own my modem, I wouldn’t get a refund or $99 rebate on the purchase of a new one.. I will end up paying rogers more money each month is all..

    • There is a solution to that. I have a DOCSIS 2.0 gateway modem/router combo and use my own router as well. I called tech support, they were able to add something to the account that disabled all wirless router/router funcationality with only one port working that I connected to my existing high-end wirless router. Works like a charm. I’m confident the same option will be available for the DOCSIS 3.0 modem.

  4. Will there still be traffic shaping in these new tiers?

  5. I’m with TSI cable right now on the 15mbit/300GB package, which is pretty good. But the main reason I’m there is because it’s unthrottled.

    Your increase in caps is great, but the primary thing that is preventing many people from using Rogers is the 24/7 throttling of P2P traffic which is also crippling WoW.

    I know you are in the process of dealing with the WoW issue specifically, but If you were to disable throttling entirely and sell against Bell’s throttled service, you could steal a lot of customers.

  6. You guys just don’t get it.

    Speed isn’t the issue. Usage is. Why is it every tier gets a usage bump except the most popular Express?? What is the point of bumping the speeds up and not significantly increasing usage…so we can get to the caps even faster I suppose??

    Sounds like a ploy to get people to spend more, to me.

    • RogersMarina says: July 20th, 2011 a 3:45pm

      Hi Cambo,

      We are always examining our plans to make sure they meet our customers changing needs. As a result, we increased the usage allowance for our most popular plans.

      If anything changes, we will let you know.

      Best,
      Marina

      • No, express is the most popular.

        As a result, you increased the usage allowance for your most expensive plans.

        That way you’re hoping people will upgrade in turn handing over more cash.

        • I agree with this comment.

          Express is the most popular internet plan type and Rogers has offered nothing for Express users.

          60 GB is simply not going to cut as as more and more HD content appears on the Net.

          Other companies are offering significantly higher bandwidth caps at a lower monthly charge.

          Rogers should consider significantly increasing bandwidth caps of risk bleeding customers in major urban centres.

      • Most popular plans? I’m willing to bet that Express is one of the most popular if not the most popular plan. Why wasn’t the usage increased on that plan?

        By increasing the download speed (and at the same time charging us more for the modem/router combo that many of us do not need or want) and keeping the usage limit the same, it will just let us reach our usage limit faster. Of course, that’s probably what Rogers intended. More money for them.

      • Renaud Bourassa says: July 21st, 2011 a 3:05pm

        “We are always examining our plans to make sure they meet our customers changing needs.”

        A year ago you lowered the cap for Extreme from 95GB to 80GB. Today, you are merely reverting this change by pushing it back to 100GB. How is that meeting your customers changing needs? I know you want to protect your cable TV from Internet offerings such as Netflix, but you could at least be subtle at it. This is simply ridiculous.

    • I also agree with this. I would rather get a larger usage bump than a speed bump — I don’t see a point in raising speeds when the data cap is still extremely restrictive. After all, I’d want to enjoy using the internet, rather than monitoring my usage restrictions every day. If Rogers really listened to the customers, they’d know that most of us are more critical of their plans’ usage restrictions than their speeds.

  7. Getting there but could be better.. To use netflix in full quality I need more bandwidth.. Speed is fine.. Also the $20 for 80GB is a bit over priced.. I understand it is priced to deter usage of services that duplicate current Rogers services but I believe this is a dirty practice.

  8. I get that Rogers needs to have bandwidth caps from a business perspective. I get that 1% of its userbase (guess) goes over those caps, what I dont get is how that 1% can really be causing enough grief for Rogers to need to introduce those caps in the first place.

    I’m a fan of variable data usage charges, when bandwitdh caps must exist. If Rogers wants to charge for bandwidth it shouldn’t be $1.50/Gb over what you pay for, it should be $5 for each 20Gb beyond your initial allotment, removing the need for customers to choose ahead of time if they need 20+Gb extra each month, and removes the painful $50 overage charge some customers might face in a month of high usage. Considering how much bandwidth is eaten up each month just by your computer (windows updates, patches for games/applications etc) keeping itself healthy, its not hard to accidentally go over your limit by a lot without realizing it, even if you are smart enough to follow your personal/family usage.

    I personally check my usage daily, but even then a single day near the end of your month of your computer doing automated things can suddenly equal large sums of overage charges. There simply is just no reason for Rogers to gouge customers at such a phenomenal rate for going over their limit, a simple tiered overage charge system would work better and be less aggravating for customers.

    Even if Rogers were to increase the cost per 20Gb as you go it would be better, $5 for 20Gb for the first 3 chunks, then $7 after that, etc..

    Note: I also agree that $5 for 20Gb is to much but that’s the current charge so I just went with it.

  9. These speed/cap increases are just not inline with customer expectations. You end up dropping a stable docsis 2 modem for a terrible router/modem combo. To boot you get the privilege of paving a higher modem rental.

    What is the reasoning here?

  10. While increased speed profiles and caps are nice for both retail and wholesale customers alike, shouldn’t you be at least matching bell with their “Overage Insurance” at $5 for 40GB?

  11. I had my router portion of my Rogers/SMC discontinued by Rogers and use my own router which works much better.

  12. RogersMarina says: July 20th, 2011 a 4:02pm

    Hi Jobu,

    As you probably have now seen in my response to Anon, the DOCSIS 3.0 Wireless N Gateway is capable of providing a greater range and higher speeds than the current DOCSIS 2.0 device, up to 300 metres under ideal conditions. Customers on a DOCSIS 2.0 modem can upgrade to these new tiers by visiting a Rogers retail location and upgrading to a DOCSIS 3.0 modem.

    Best,
    Marina

    • Did you mean to put 300 metres or is that supposed to read 300 Mbps

      • RogersMarina says: July 20th, 2011 a 5:05pm

        Hi Chris,

        Yes, I was referring to the signal strength, not the speed. The DOCSIS 3.0 modem can reach up to 300 metres in range under ideal conditions. Sorry for the confusion.

        Marina

        • Yes Chris, the maximum, outdoor, NO interference range is 300 meters. You will NEVER see this in practice because there is ALWAYS some interference. In practical usage indoors, barring a large amount of interference and/or the fact that these particular wireless N combo devices that Rogers uses are not great, one wireless N router should very nicely cover the whole house with great reception.

      • They mean metres. Wireless N can do up to 600 Mbps.

        Fortunately the 300 metres number ‘under ideal conditions’ will never be achieved, but it’s still something every user should turn off immediately. 5GHz signal penetrates material far worse than 2.4GHz does, but it’s still going to be much longer range than ‘g’. If I were being cynical I would guess the plan is to get your network wardriven so they can charge you more for bandwidth.

        The number of people who need a range of *30* metres from a single access point is very small. 300 m is utterly absurd. Even from where I live if I draw a 300m circle around my apartment you’d hit 3 other buildings, multiple subdivisions and you’d overlap with several businesses. Well over 500 and more like 700 or 800 overlapping residences from one point, and you’d have to consider interference from all directions. Did I mention there are only 22 or 23 channels in the 5GHz band allocated for wireless N at full width (40MHz)? N is pretty good about resolving frequency band conflicts but that only works so well with multiple people all trying to sit on a single band, it’s going to cause more problems than it solves if it works anywhere close to as advertised (which fortunately it probably won’t, but still).

        If you get one of these, do a favour to your neighbours and turn it off and use your own (lower power…) networking equipment. Looking just at wireless b/g in the 2.4 GHz band right now I count 23 access points visible with a crappy laptop and no dedicated antenna (with an amplitude above-90dB). That’s going to be a mix of ranged between the 40-150 m (roughly) specified by the g standard. Want to see where this is going to go badly with wireless N equipment quickly? Rogers engineers should know better than to even try and put equipment like this out in public.

        • I’m trying to point out it has nothing to do with DOCSIS 3.. It’s the Wireless that has a theoretical 300 meter range….

    • But Marina not all of us are interested in wireless, I have a SB 5100 (bought from Rogers) and a perfectly capable wired router/firewall. I don’t need wireless. If Rogers wants us all to move up to Docsis 3.0 then whyn not offer a stand alone modem?

      • RogersMarina says: July 21st, 2011 a 12:30pm

        Hi Michael,

        We only offer a gateway on our Docsis 3.0 service in order to ensure a good customer experience. Most of our customers prefer to utilize the built in wireless capabilities of our combined modem and router. For those who want to use their own router, the gateway can be set to bridge modem mode.

        Best,
        Marina

        • Correction: For those who want to use their own router can pay more per month to continue doing so.

          I could see justifying this if you were actually offering more but really what you’re doing is just a minimal increase from the huge decrease you placed last year with the announcment of netflix

        • “Most of our customers prefer to utilize the built in wireless capabilities of our combined modem and router.”

          How could this statement be possibly true when the wireless capabilities of of the DOCSIS3 does not work properly at all? This is why customers are clamouring for a stand alone modem – so that they can hook up their own router and actually have a router that works. Why pay more for a dual modem/router when the router does not work?

    • Marina,

      The SMC device (DOCSIS 3.0 Wireless N Gateway) that Rogers offers is a combination wireless router and cable modem. The router part is very unstable, and so many customers like myself would prefer to use our own routers.

      Also, since my old DOCSIS 2 cable modem can handle speeds up to 42 Mbps, why can’t I use it for all packages except “Ultimate”?

      Why should I pay more money for something that is technically unnecessary? I hope you now understand my question.

    • This router/modem combination is not an upgrade because your response assumes we aren’t already running our home networks on good routers. I spent a lot of money to have a top of the line N router in my house. Why would I pay more per month to be forced to downgrade to a G router, or better yet be forced to almost double my current rental fee to get the N router/modem combination. This is not helping, in fact it is just more agitating. Good thing my contract expires this month.

  13. Thanks for the new faster speeds and higher caps..

    Unfortunately I’m on Express so NO higher caps.

    Unfortunately I BOUGHT my modem from Rogers and it is a SB51090 so NO higher speeds.

    So, thanks for NOTHING.

    Perhaps Rogers might want to consider an incentive for loyal customers like a reduced cost on a new modem? Because the way I see it if I have to buy a new modem for a modest speed increase and no increase in cap then I might as well go elsewhere.

    • RogersMarina says: July 20th, 2011 a 5:23pm

      Thanks for the feedback Michael. It’s an interesting idea. I’ll pass that along to the team here.

  14. What about upload speed? It takes forever to upload anything. 1mbps is not enough.

    • RogersMarina says: July 21st, 2011 a 12:15pm

      Hello Don,

      The upload speeds on our plans have not changed. If anything changes, we will let you know.

      Best,
      Marina

  15. Leaving your most popular plan out of the increased data caps (Express) and requiring a wireless router/modem combo which many do not want (in order to get rental fees) makes Rogers’ motivation here pretty transparent.

    This isn’t about better plans and service, it’s about encouraging upgrades.

    I hope the CRTC brings the hammer down on this industry but I’m not holding my breath.

  16. Thank you for nothing Rogers. I subscribe to Express, but I will never consider anything other than what I have now until Rogers provides a better modem and/or router other than the current SMC or the new CISCO. You offer a whole 2 mbps higher speed with no improvement to usage allowance if I move up to a D3 modem. Please let me know when you get a decent D3 modem and a stand alone modem at that!

  17. I will NEVER upgrade to Docsis 3.0. Their crappy SMC modems are terrible. I prefer my own Asus RT N16 wireless router + docsis 2.0 modem. So far i’m at 54 days uptime for my router. So, I will upgrade once they release a regular (non-wireless) docsis 3 modem.

  18. Chris Rogers says: July 21st, 2011 a 12:42am

    Thanks Open Media for forcing evil companies like Rogers to raise their usage limits to meet with the REAL world. Rogers and all members of the oligopoly should be ashamed of themselves.

  19. Upload speed?? When will we get similar upload speeds to those in the US. 2 Mbps is pittiful. The US plans start at 5 Mbps!!! Social media is a TWO way street remember! For it to work, people need to UPLOAD stuff to share!

  20. Cool, you upped the bandwidth limits to slightly better then before you DROPED the bandwidth limits when Netflix launched.

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